I seek refuge in mindfulness

This morning, as other mornings, I turn to the skies to align my day. The dawn’s sky is navy blue and red – streaks that look as if a mad painter has swished his brush to and fro with a flourish. And peeking through a pocket or two, sits the robin’s egg blue sky.

It’s beautiful. I close my eyes.

I need to be silent for awhile, worlds are forming in my heart.  Meister Eckhart

I have turned to the dawn’s sky as refuge from the news. I did not stay up late to watch the election results. Instead, I awoke at five as usual and my husband has leaned over and whispered to me, “You are not going to be happy with the election results.”

His words caused me to leap out of bed. Stunned, I watched the CBC news.

I’ve spent my last ten years trying to live a life of simplicity, wholeness, and lovingkindness. I’ve surrounded myself with people who share similar beliefs, values and intentions. We strive to live fully, creatively, in love and compassion. Some of us meditate and live mindfully; some of us pray; and some of us share with John Muir, that Nature is my Church.

And although most of us are not Buddhists, we strive to embody its’ philosophies or tenets: Do no harm; Lovingkindness and generosity; Right resolve, right action, right speech, right concentration, etc.  All philosophies shared with Christianity and other world religions.

So this morning I feel the earth has shifted. I feel that worlds are colliding (in the immortal words of Seinfeld’s beloved character, George).

Everything has changed. Nothing has changed.

We carry on. We continue to be aware – to be mindful of the moments that make up our days, our lives. We continue to laugh, to cry, to support one another, to pray, and to meditate.

But for me, I vow to see more, to see clearly – to remove the rose-coloured glasses that prevented me from seeing and acknowledging the truth – that many suffer. And they suffer deeply.

When I wrote my free ebook on caring for parents with dementia, I offered to the reader that all of us, including those who suffer with Alzheimer’s and other dementia s, want to know that we matter – we all want to be seen, to be heard, and most of all, we want to know that we matter.

For me, this is the lesson that we have been profoundly offered.

My grandma would say when things go wrong it’s a Buddhist gift.  The Provence Cure for the Brokenhearted, Bridget Asher

Let us carry on today with eyes wide open. In awareness, may we really see each other. And let us touch base with the stillness within each of us, that continually guides and steers us to a life of acceptance, love, kindness, compassion and generosity.

I intend to let go of the discord and toxic energy that I felt this morning when I first turned on the television.

Instead, I turn to my strengths: honesty, trust, compassion, curiosity, service, creativity and connections.

All gifts.

The more we accept and expand our own unique gifts, the more we can share and connect with others. And all of this begins with awareness.

When we live in awareness (that is, we begin to pay attention to each moment) we change our perceptions. In mindfulness, we perceive the many acts of grace that surround us.

Acts of grace. Those are the gifts that will transform us.

 

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